State Agencies | Online Services
 

Project DAWN (Deaths Avoided with Naloxone)

 

 

What's New?

Guidance Document for Law Enforcement Agencies Seeking to Obtain Naloxone Hydrochloride (Narcan®) – Updated July 23, 2014

Ohio Board of Pharmacy issues guidance document for local agencies who wish to start distributing naloxone through their TDDDL

Governor Kasich signs HB 170 into law expanding naloxone access to law enforcement and friends and family of opioid users

Intranasal Naloxone Scope of Practice and Training Resources for Ohio EMRs and EMTs – Ohio EMS Board 

Presentations from the Project Dawn webinar on June 24, 2014 

Naloxone Distribution Programs: Saving Lives in Ohio 

Portsmouth, Ohio Slides 

Stark County Slides 

What is Project DAWN?

Project DAWN is a community-based overdose education and naloxone distribution program. Project DAWN participants receive training on:

  • Recognizing the signs and symptoms of overdose
  • Distinguishing between different types of overdose
  • Performing rescue breathing
  • Calling emergency medical services
  • Administering intranasal Naloxone

Project DAWN Sites

List of Project DAWN sites in Ohio

What is Naloxone?

Naloxone (also known as Narcan) is a medication that can reverse an overdose caused by an opioid drug (heroin or prescription pain medications). When administered during an overdose, naloxone blocks the effects of opioids on the brain and quickly restores breathing. Naloxone has been used safely by emergency medical professionals for more than 40 years and has only this one critical function: to reverse the effects of opioids in order to prevent overdose death. Naloxone has no potential for abuse.

If naloxone is given to a person who is not experiencing an opioid overdose, it is harmless. If naloxone is administered to a person who is dependent on opioids, it will produce withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal, although uncomfortable, is not life-threatening.

Naloxone does not reverse overdoses that are caused by non-opioid drugs, such as cocaine, benzodiazepines (e.g. Xanex, Klonopin and Valium), methamphetamines, or alcohol. 

According to a recent CDC Publication, between 1996 and June 2010, more than 53,000 individuals have been trained and given naloxone by overdose prevention programs, leading to reports of over 10,100 overdose reversals during this period.

Learn how to bring naloxone to your community below!

Project DAWN Resources

Project DAWN Background Document

Project DAWN Site Development At-A-Glance

Project DAWN Brochure - Portsmouth

Quick Reference Guide - Portsmouth

Resources related to Ohio's Naloxone Regulations and Laws

HB 170:  Ohio's Naloxone Law for Third Party Prescribing

Ohio Board of Pharmacy issues updated naloxone guidance document for law enforcement agencies

Ohio Board of Pharmacy issues guidance document for local agencies who wish to start distributing naloxone through their TDDDL

Intranasal Naloxone Scope of Practice and Training Resources for Ohio EMRs and EMTs – Ohio EMS Board 

Joint Ohio Medical, Pharmacy and Nursing Boards Regulatory Statement - Prescription of Naloxone to High-Risk Individuals

Naloxone-related Reports

CDC Report: Community-Based Opioid Overdose Prevention Programs Providing Naloxone - United States, 2010

Project DAWN 9-1-1 Good Samaritan Overdose Survey Results

Naloxone (Narcan®) Administration in Ohio 2003-2012

 

Overdose Prevention Education Video 

Part 1

 

 

Part 2

Click here to view the full version of the Project DAWN Portsmouth education video

Click here to view the full version of the Project DAWN Cuyahoga education video


Last Reviewed 8/27/2014